Preparing for the Future Workplace Webinar

By BlessingWhite , a Division of GP Strategies

Futurist and author Jeanne Meister of Future Workplace facilitates a discussion on the future workplace trends. Ms. Meister will share insights and current trends that are influencing the world of work, including:

 

  • Learning
  • Technology
  • Employee engagement
  • Culture and values
  • And Importantly: how to close the gaps between perceptions of HR and Business Leaders

 

This 60 minute future workplace trends webinar is designed to help inform those who are focused on creating the organization that will thrive in 2020 and beyond.

 


Webinar Q&A:

 

Q: ­Does the Gig transcend all sectors — specific to some arenas more than others?­

 

A. The gig economy has its roots in the services sector – with companies like Task Rabbit and Plated; but this model includes Uber drivers and people who rent their space out on AirBnB. Also – workers in the technology sector have embraced this new model since software can be written anywhere anytime. And it is hugely successful in the design and graphics space.

 

Q: ­Is there insight available on loyalty/turnover rate of millennials and forecast of gen z’ers with corporate employers? If findings indicate these populations stay for less than 2 yrs how will this impact decisions to move into such new/bold directions?­

 

A: There is a lot of conflicting data around turnover rates and millennials. While they have the reputation of being “job-hoppers”, this reputation is not warranted! In fact, the average tenure for young workers has actually been stable since 1983 (source: https://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/enough-already-about-the-job-hopping-millennials/)

 

Young workers in general tend to job-hop more, while older workers stay with one organization for longer. There is no reason right now to think that the patterns for Gen Z will be any different. The main aspect that could impact their average job tenure is the same as it always has been: the economy. People change jobs more often during times of economic growth, and turnover rates slow down during an economic slump. Gen Z will not job hop more than anyone else under ~34, and will stay with employers longer the older they get.

 

Q: You mentioned the importance of transparency in working with Gen Z employees – can you talk a bit more about that?

 

A: Gen Z has grown up with radical transparency tools as the default. Now with a few google searches and some browsing through glasssdoor.com, anyone can find out a good deal more about your company than has ever before been available. Leaders and organizations will never have more control over information than they do now.

 

Because so much information is readily available, Gen Z expects that this information will also readily be shared. Whether it is about internal decision-making, the structure or priorities of the company, or your own approach to your work, Gen Z believes that more is more when it comes to information.

 

To work well with Gen Z employees, develop a bias toward disclosure when it comes to your work, your priorities, and your strengths and weaknesses. When possible, look for opportunities to let them provide feedback or their point of view on the organization so you encourage them to be transparent as well. If you can earn their trust you will keep these your entrepreneurial workers engaged!

 

Q: ­Are Innovation Centers like “skunk works”?­

 

A: Innovation Centers provide a range of benefits including providing access and exposure to the newest technologies and how they might be used to acquire a deeper understand of customer needs. We also see them being used to drive innovation by fostering relationships with university researchers and actively identifying and connecting established companies with mentors and start-ups.

 

Q: Do you think the the ‘middle-career’ group had to turn to Gig Employment because they have a hard time finding full-time corporate work?

 

A: More and more middle career employees are looking to do something new – perhaps inspired by the entrepreneurial spirit of Millennial and Gen Zs. As cost cutting continues to have an impact on headcount at large companies, many people find they would rather not go back into a corporate job but are willing to either start their own business or work as a free-lancer for many different clients. Both technology and culture make this much easier than ever before.

 

Q: what are some of the best places or sites to begin to curate MOOCs if you’re just beginning?

 

A: The largest vendor is Coursera – I would recommend starting there. Other major suppliers include edX, Udacity, iversity and NovoEd. Prestigious academic institutions also offering MOOCs including Harvard,, Stanford and MIT. A complete list that is updated frequently can be viewed at https://www.mooc-list.com/

 

Q: What are the pros and cons of curating MOOCs vs creating your own?

 

A: To create really impactful MOOC requires skills approaching those of a movie production studio. To do it right you really need a great videographer and editor, not to mention someone to write and also direct the course. That said – once created, you can not only control the content but can distribute it very cost effectively. Many companies are using a blended approach – finding MOOCs to curate that align with existing curriculum and creating their own where a bespoke solution is the best option.

 

Q: Do you think the the ‘middle-career’ group had to turn to Gig Employment because they have a hard time finding full-time corporate work?

 

A: More and more middle career employees are looking to do something new – perhaps inspired by the entrepreneurial spirit of Millennial and Gen Zs. As cost cutting continues to have an impact on headcount at large companies, many people find they would rather not go back into a corporate job but are willing to either start their own business or work as a free-lancer for many different clients. Both technology and culture make this much easier than ever before.

 

Q: What are some of the best places or sites to begin to curate MOOCs if you’re just beginning?

 

A: The largest vendor is Coursera – I would recommend starting there. Other major suppliers include edX, Udacity, iversity and NovoEd. Prestigious academic institutions also offering MOOCs including Harvard,, Stanford and MIT. A complete list that is updated frequently can be viewed at https://www.mooc-list.com/

 

Q: What are the pros and cons of curating MOOCs vs creating your own?

 

A: To create really impactful MOOCs requires skills approaching those of a movie production studio. To do it right you really need a great videographer and editor, not to mention someone to write and also direct the course. That said – once created, you can not only control the content but can distribute it very cost effectively. Many companies are using a blended approach – finding MOOCs to curate that align with existing curriculum and creating their own where a bespoke solution is the best option.

 

Enter a response to the question, “What aspect of the future world of work does your organization need to start preparing for?” in the comment section and we will randomly pick 5 posts to receive a free copy of author Jeanne Meister’s book, “The 2020 Workplace.”

 

*One entry per person, winners will be randomly selected and notified by email on Friday, Jan 22, 2016

Download the slides from this session.